California Implementation Details Discussed at CRRA 2015

MRC’s Managing Director Mike O’Donnell will discuss the impacts to the existing solid waste infrastructure, current challenges, and how the program plan will work with stakeholders in the months prior to implementation. MRC will share implementation timelines along with information on how solid waste facilities, municipalities, and recyclers will be impacted by these new programs.

Thursday, August 6
Session 20: “Implementing California’s Used Mattress and Recovery Act”
10:15- 11:45am PST
Millennium Biltmore Hotel
Los Angeles, California
Conference Website

Manufacturers & Retailers: Time is Running Out to Comply with the State Mattress Recycling Laws

Mattress manufacturers and retailers that do not comply with certain legal requirements in three states with mattress recycling laws could experience a disruption of sales. The Mattress Recycling Council (MRC) is hosting a seminar for retailers, manufacturers and other market attendees at the Las Vegas Market at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, August 4 in Building B, 16th floor to discuss the Connecticut, California and Rhode Island laws and other topics.

MRC’s leadership will share highlights of the program plans that it submitted to California and Rhode Island state authorities earlier this month, provide updates on the implementation of Connecticut’s program, answer questions about each state’s law, the industry’s obligations and the consequences of non-compliance, and introduce new resources that MRC has developed to help the industry comply with the law and communicate to customers.

“Mattress manufacturers, importers and retailers all have a role in this program’s success,” said Ryan Trainer, president of MRC and the International Sleep Products Association (ISPA). “If you aren’t complying with these state laws, you run the risk of not being able to sell your products in these states. We urge market attendees to join us to learn the latest information about how these laws affect their business.”

ISPA formed MRC, a non-profit organization, to develop efficient, cost-effective and consumer friendly mattress recycling programs for all three states. For additional information about the Mattress Recycling Council, state implementation timelines and the latest legislative developments in mattress recycling, visit http://www.mattressrecyclingcouncil.org

MRC Submits its Rhode Island Recycling Plan for Review

Today, MRC submitted its Rhode Island Mattress Recycling Plan to the Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation (RIRRC) for review. The plan reflects two years of planning, stakeholder outreach and discussions to develop a collection, transportation and recycling program for used mattresses in Rhode Island. The program, created by a 2013 mattress recycling law, will be called Bye Bye Mattress. If approved by RIRRC within the 90-day review period, the recycling program would begin in early 2016.

The proposed program will be funded through a $10.00 recycling fee that is collected on the sale of each new or renovated mattress or box spring sold to Rhode Island consumers and then remitted to MRC. MRC will use those funds to provide mattress collection, transportation and recycling services for cities and towns, military bases, universities and hospitals, as well as private sector businesses like mattress retailers and hotels. The fee is also used to create free drop-off collection points for Rhode Island residents at solid waste facilities throughout the state and provide a reimbursement to those who drop-off mattresses directly at designated recycling facilities.

Rhode Island’s law resulted from the International Sleep Products Association’s (ISPA) effort to develop a practical and economically efficient approach to mattress recycling.

“The mattress industry has developed a program that benefits all Rhode Island consumers and the environment,” said Ryan Trainer, president of MRC and ISPA. “Mattress manufacturers, importers, retailers and renovators all have a role in this program’s success. Under the law, you must register with MRC in order to keep selling mattresses in Rhode Island once the program goes into effect. Registering now means you’ll be more informed and better prepared as the program launches, and won’t experience disruptions in your ability to sell your products in the state.”

MRC will discuss the Rhode Island program and answer compliance questions during a Las Vegas Market seminar about mattress recycling on Tuesday, August 4, 2015. The seminar will be held from 1:00-2:00 p.m. in Building B, WorldView on 16.

MRC has provided a toll-free support line, dedicated email, written guidelines and a step-by-step video to assist the mattress industry with registering through the organization’s online portal – mrcreporting.org.

MRC recently launched the nation’s first statewide mattress recycling program in Connecticut and will also operate California’s program, due to begin in early 2016. To learn more about these state programs, go to mattressrecyclingcouncil.org.

ABOUT RHODE ISLAND’S LAW

In 2013 Rhode Island enacted Senate Bill 261A, which became Chapter 23-90 of the state’s Health & Safety Code, and required mattress manufacturers to create a statewide recycling program for discarded mattresses.  The program is expected to launch in 2016 and is funded through a visible recycling fee collected at retail from customers on each mattress and foundation sold in the state.  These fees will fund the collection and recycling of mattresses and box springs used and discarded in Rhode Island. The Mattress Recycling Council (MRC), a non-profit organization established by the mattress industry, will create and manage this recycling program. MRC has been authorized by RIRRC to develop and administer the program.

ABOUT ISPA

Established in 1915, the International Sleep Products Association (ISPA) is dedicated to protecting and enhancing the growth, profitability and stature of the mattress industry. As the industry’s trade organization, ISPA is the voice of the mattress industry, representing mattress manufacturers and suppliers throughout the world.

To learn more, visit www.sleepproducts.org or contact info@sleepproducts.org.

MRC Submits its California Recycling Plan for Review

Today, MRC submitted its California Mattress Recycling Plan to the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) for review. The plan reflects two years of planning, stakeholder outreach and discussions to develop a collection, transportation and recycling program for used mattresses in California. The program, created by a 2013 mattress recycling law, will be called Bye Bye Mattress. If approved by CalRecycle within the 90-day review period, the recycling program would begin in January 2016.

MRC today also submitted to CalRecycle a three-year budget for the program which, if approved, will be funded through an $11.00 recycling fee that is collected on the sale of each new or renovated mattress and box spring sold to California consumers and then remitted to MRC. MRC will use those funds to provide mattress collection, transportation and recycling services for cities and towns, military bases, universities and hospitals, as well as private sector businesses like mattress retailers and hotels. The fee is also used to create free drop-off collection points for California residents at solid waste facilities throughout the state, provide a reimbursement to those who drop-off mattresses directly at designated recycling facilities, and support a fund to help communities battle illegal dumping.

California’s law resulted from the International Sleep Products Association’s (ISPA) work with various stakeholders to develop a practical and economically efficient approach to mattress recycling.

“The mattress industry has developed a program that benefits all California consumers and the environment,” said Ryan Trainer, president of MRC and ISPA. “Mattress manufacturers, importers, retailers and renovators all have a role in this program’s success. Under the law, you must register with MRC in order to keep selling mattresses in California once the program goes into effect. Registering now means you’ll be more informed and better prepared as the program launches, and won’t experience disruptions in your ability to sell your products in California.”

MRC will discuss the California program and answer compliance questions during a Las Vegas Market seminar about mattress recycling on Tuesday, August 4, 2015. The seminar will be held from 1:00-2:00 p.m. in Building B, WorldView on 16.

MRC has also provided a toll-free support line, dedicated email, written guidelines and a step-by-step video to assist the mattress industry with registering through the organization’s online portal – mrcreporting.org.

MRC recently launched the nation’s first statewide mattress recycling program in Connecticut and will also operate Rhode Island’s mattress recycling program, due to begin in early 2016. To learn more about these state programs, go to mattressrecyclingcouncil.org.

ABOUT THE USED MATTRESS RECOVERY AND RECYCLING ACT

California’s Used Mattress Recovery and Recycling Act (enacted in 2013 and amended in 2014) requires mattress manufacturers to create a statewide recycling program for mattresses discarded in the state. The program is expected to launch in early 2016 and is funded through a recycling fee collected from consumers when a mattress or box spring is sold.  MRC has been certified by CalRecycle to develop and administer the program.

ABOUT ISPA

Established in 1915, the International Sleep Products Association (ISPA) is dedicated to protecting and enhancing the growth, profitability and stature of the mattress industry. As the industry’s trade organization, ISPA is the voice of the mattress industry, representing mattress manufacturers and suppliers throughout the world.

To learn more, visit www.sleepproducts.org or contact info@sleepproducts.org.

Connecticut Says Hello to Bye Bye Mattress

Today, Connecticut becomes the first state in the nation with a statewide recycling program for used mattresses and box springs. The program, known as Bye Bye Mattress, is administered by the Mattress Recycling Council (MRC), a non-profit organization created by the mattress industry to develop and manage the state mattress recycling program mandated by law in 2013. Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP), city leaders and representatives from the solid waste and recycling industry gathered at the City of Hartford’s Bulky Waste & Recycling Center to commemorate the inaugural truckload of mattresses bound for the recycling facility.

“The implementation of this first in the nation mattress stewardship program means previously discarded mattresses will be recycled in an environmentally sound manner, sustaining jobs in Connecticut and resulting in cost savings for municipalities,” said DEEP’s Commissioner Robert Klee. “This program mirrors similar stewardship programs the state has enacted for electronics, paint and thermostats. We recognize the Mattress Recycling Council for their commitment to the success of this program and the City of Hartford for their leadership in getting this law passed.”

Bye Bye Mattress allows Connecticut residents to drop-off used mattresses at participating collection sites and recycling facilities for free. Almost 50 cities and towns across Connecticut have joined the program as designated collection locations, with some also providing curb-side pick-up. These sites span the state across urban and rural areas. Residents that take their used mattresses directly to one of the designated recycling facilities located in East Hartford or Bridgeport will receive $2 per mattress from the recycler (limit four per person per day/eight per person per year). Connecticut residents can find their nearest participating collection site or recycling facility at www.byebyemattress.com.

MRC is also working with mattress retailers, hotels, military facilities, universities, healthcare facilities and other public and private entities in Connecticut to divert mattresses from the solid waste stream. It will report the program’s progress to DEEP each October.

“Working with all stakeholders, the industry has taken a major step toward creating a cost-effective solution to a long-term problem,” said Ryan Trainer, president of MRC. “We designed Connecticut’s program to increase the recycling of used mattress materials by leveraging the existing waste collection infrastructure. MRC is working with many types of businesses and industries to recycle their used mattresses through the program. The Connecticut resident benefits from the no-cost drop-off opportunities. This will both encourage more mattress recycling as well as discourage illegal dumping.”

The program is funded through a $9 recycling fee that is collected when a mattress or box spring is sold to Connecticut consumers. Consumers will notice this fee as a separate line item on their receipt. The fee is used to pay for transporting and recycling the discarded mattresses.

Similar recycling programs are expected to launch in California and Rhode Island in 2016. To learn more about Bye Bye Mattress visit www.byebyemattress.com.

 

Recycling Facts

Each year, 35 to 40 million new mattresses and box springs are sold in the United States, and at least 15 to 20 million used mattresses and box springs are discarded.

More than 80% of a used mattress’ components can be recycled —the metal springs, foam, wood and fibers — and made into new useful products. For example:

  • The steel springs are recycled as metal scrap and can be melted and used to make new appliances, building materials and other steel products.
  • The foam can be turned into carpet underlayment or animal bed padding.
  • The wooden frames can be shredded to produce landscaping mulch.
  • The cotton and other fiber can be used in industrial oil filters and other textile applications.

The Recycling Process

Most recyclers currently use the following process to dismantle a mattress:

  1. The top mattress layer (including the outer fabric) is cut, peeled and separated from the mattress’ interior materials (which can include fiber, polyurethane or latex foam and steel springs).
  2. The interior materials are pulled apart and separated by type.
  3. Foam, fiber and other soft commodities are baled and compressed for transport to scrap dealers or companies that will consume them to make new products.
  4. Metal springs from mattresses and box springs are extracted and sent to scrap recyclers that will sell them to steel mills and foundries.
  5. Wood is chipped or shredded.

Connecticut’s Statewide Mattress Recycling Program to Begin May 1

On December 31, 2014 the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) approved the Connecticut Mattress Stewardship Plan developed by the Mattress Recycling Council (MRC), a non-profit organization created by the mattress industry to develop and manage the statewide mattress recycling program established by Public Act 13-42. This makes Connecticut the first state to work with MRC to implement a statewide mattress recycling program.

The approved plan requires that retailers add a $9 recycling fee to each new or renovated mattress and box spring sold to Connecticut consumers. Consumers will begin to see this fee as a separate line item on their receipt beginning on May 1. Retailers and other businesses selling mattresses will remit the fees to MRC. The fees will pay for contractors that will collect and recycle the mattresses.

“Today, Connecticut has taken another step towards reaffirming its leadership in materials management,” said Robert Klee Commissioner of DEEP. “I applaud the mattress industry for working with us to develop a solution that protects consumers, works efficiently with our existing municipal solid waste networks and values the recovery of the natural resources contained in the thousands of mattresses that are buried in landfills, lost to incineration or abandoned in our communities each year.”

This program will divert mattresses from the solid waste stream to recyclers who will extract valuable resources including steel, foam and cotton from each mattress. It also minimizes recycling costs to consumers because the statewide program creates an economy of scale.

“Responsibly managing discarded mattresses benefits consumers and the environment, and it’s most effective when done on a large scale,” said Ryan Trainer, president of MRC. “Through this law, the mattress industry has developed a self-sustaining infrastructure for handling these products.”

MRC estimates that in the United States at least 20 million mattresses and box springs are discarded each year when consumers replace their old mattress with a new one. This averages to about 50,000 daily.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Is the fee charged on any type of mattress?
The law defines mattress as a new or renovated mattress or box spring. It does not include: any mattress pad, mattress topper, sleeping bag, pillow, car bed, carriage, basket, dressing table, stroller, playpen, infant carrier, lounge pad, crib bumper, waterbed or air mattress, fold-out sofa bed or futon.

How can consumers recycle a mattress?
Consumers will continue to dispose of mattresses through traditional methods such as municipal collection or drop off, or retailer take back when a new mattress is delivered. These mattresses, which may have previously gone to a landfill or waste-to-energy facility, can now be recycled. Consumers may also drop off mattresses at designated recycling facilities at no charge.

What types of mattresses will the program accept for recycling?
Any mattress or box spring discarded by Connecticut consumers is eligible for recycling. However, the program will not accept:

• Severely damaged, wet, twisted, frozen or soiled mattresses or box springs
• Mattresses or box springs infested with bed bugs
• Mattress pads or toppers
• Sleeping bags
• Pillows
• Car beds
• Juvenile products (i.e., carriage, basket, dressing table, stroller, playpen, infant carrier, lounge pad, or crib bumpers)
• Crib and bassinet mattresses
• Water beds or camping air mattresses
• Fold-out sofa beds
• Futons and furniture

California State Assembly Approves SB 254 (Hancock/Correa) Which Would Create A Used Mattress Recycling Program

Sacramento, CA – On Wednesday, September 11, 2013, the California State Assembly voted to approve SB 254 authored by Senator Loni Hancock (D-Berkeley) and Senator Lou Correa (D-Santa Ana) by a 63-10 bipartisan vote.

SB 254 (Hancock/Correa) creates a used mattress recycling program that will have a dedicated funding mechanism, reduce the impact of illegally dumped mattresses, harness existing infrastructure for transporting used mattresses to recyclers, create jobs, and minimize costs to both government and consumers.

International Sleep Products Association President, Ryan Trainer commented, “We are very pleased the members of the California State Assembly recognize the merits of SB 254. All stakeholders collaborated to help refine this legislation into a used mattress recycling policy that will benefit consumers, retailers, manufacturers, and the environment.  This is an effective and efficient piece of legislation and ISPA is proud to be a part of the solution in dealing with recycling used mattresses.”

SB 254 enjoys a broad range of support from industry, retailers, cities and counties, local elected officials, and waste management organizations. Per the legislation, SB 254 creates a non-profit mattress recycling organization whose duty would be to plan, implement and administer a state system to collect discarded used mattresses, dismantle them and recycle their materials for use in new products. The program will be sustained by collecting a nominal fee at retail on the sale of new mattresses and box-springs.

Many of the SB 254 coalition members recently participated in a press conference to demonstrate their support to the legislation.  During the event, co-author of SB 254, Senator Lou Correa stated, “Californians buy about 4 million new mattresses and box springs each year, and discard roughly 2 million units.  Dealing with discarded mattresses is a big job for this state.  The goals set forth in SB 254 establish a sound foundation to move California forward in further preserving and protecting our communities from blight.”

SB 254 provides Californians with a comprehensive mattress recycling solution that is consumer-friendly, cost-effective and efficient. The program authorized by SB 254 is very similar to existing recycling systems in California and other states for other consumer products.

Shelly Sullivan representing Californians for Mattress Recycling stated, “Californians are committed to their recycling practices.  SB 254 (Hancock/Correa) simply puts a price on used mattresses akin to California’s bottle and can recycling program and gives Californians another avenue to broaden the scope of the state’s recycling portfolio.”

In the next few days SB 254 (Hancock/Correa) will move to the Senate Floor for a concurrence vote.

Californians for Mattress Recycling is an ad hoc group representing stakeholders united in their support for efficient and practical mattress recycling.  For more information contact Shelly Sullivan at (916) 858-8686 or go to:  http://www.ca4mattressrecycling.org

 

 

CALIFORNIA USED MATTRESS RECYCLING LEGISLATION APPROVED BY CALIFORNIA STATE SENATE SB

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE May 30, 2013

CALIFORNIA USED MATTRESS RECYCLING LEGISLATION
APPROVED BY CALIFORNIA STATE SENATE SB 254
254 (Hancock/Correa) Now Moves to the Assembly 

(Sacramento, CA) — On Wednesday, May 29, 2013, California’s State Senate approved SB 254 (Hancock/Correa) by a 32-5 bipartisan vote.

SB 254 creates a used mattress recycling program that will reduce the impact of illegally dumped mattresses, harness existing infrastructure for transporting used mattresses to recyclers, create jobs, and minimize costs to both government and consumers.

International Sleep Products Association President, Ryan Trainer commented, “We are very pleased the California State Senate recognizes that SB 254 will improve used mattress recycling in the state in a practical and efficient manner. Since its inception, all stakeholders have been diligently working to craft sound used mattress recycling policy that will benefit consumers, retailers, manufacturers, and the environment. I want to thank the bill’s authors, Senators Loni Hancock and Lou Correa, for their leadership on this issue.”

The legislation provides Californians with a comprehensive mattress recycling solution that is consumer-friendly, cost-effective and efficient. The program authorized by SB 254 is very similar to existing recycling systems in California and other states for other consumer products.

SB 254 enjoys a broad range of support from industry, retailers, cities and counties, local elected officials, and waste management organizations. It creates a non-profit mattress recycling organization that will plan, implement and administer a state system to collect discarded used mattresses, dismantle them and recycle their materials for use in new products. The program will be funded by a nominal fee collected at retail on the sale of new mattresses and box-springs.

Shelly Sullivan representing Californians for Mattress Recycling stated, “SB 254 (Hancock/Correa) simply puts a nominal fee on used mattresses akin to California’s paint recycling program. It’s good common sense legislation that helps Californians improve their recycling performance.”

SB 254 (Hancock-Correa) now moves to the Assembly for Committee hearings and a floor vote.

Californians for Mattress Recycling is an ad hoc group representing stakeholders united in their support for efficient and practical mattress recycling.  For more information contact Shelly Sullivan at (916) 858-8686 or go to:  http://www.ca4mattressrecycling.org

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CALIFORNIA USED MATTRESS RECYCLING LEGISLATION CLEARS KEY SENATE COMMITTEE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 19, 2013
Contact:  Shelly Sullivan – (916) 858-8686

Sacramento, CA — On Wednesday, April 17, 2013, the California’s State Senate Environmental Quality Committee approved SB 254 (Hancock-Correa) by a 6-0 vote.

SB 254 creates a used mattress recycling program that will have a dedicated funding mechanism, reduce the impact of illegally dumped mattresses, harness existing infrastructure for transporting used mattresses to recyclers, creates jobs, and minimizes costs to both government and consumers.

Californians for Mattress Recycling Spokesperson, Shelly Sullivan stated, “We applaud the leadership of the Environmental Quality Chair, Senator Jerry Hill along with Senators Correa and Hancock and the International Sleep Products Association and Californians Against Waste for working so diligently late last week to amend the critical components of the Correa bill, SB 245 into SB 254 prior to this hearing.”

The result provides Californians with a comprehensive mattress recycling solution that is consumer friendly and efficient.  The SB 254 model is now very similar to existing successful recycling systems in California for paint and used carpet.

International Sleep Products Association President, Ryan Trainer commented, “We are pleased to be moving forward with a single bill to address used mattress recycling in California. SB 254 (Hancock-Correa) remains a work in progress, and we are confident that by working with all stakeholders, we can continue our efforts to develop public policy that will be best for California mattress consumers, retailers, manufacturers and the environment.”

Sullivan noted, “A lot of speculation has been made about the financial figures associated with this legislation.  Those costs will be determined by the recycling program group, but it is critical to note that manufacturers and retailers do not want those costs to be any higher than absolutely necessary.  The goal is to assure that we establish a sound recycling program that is easy to use in removing used mattresses from landfills, vacant lots and highways.”

SB 254 (Hancock-Correa) now moves to the Senate Appropriations Committee.

 

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