MRC Participating in America Recycles Day Events

Nov. 1, 2019 — As a leader in sustainability and recycling, the Mattress Recycling Council (MRC) is participating in events leading up to America Recycles Day on Nov. 15 including the America Recycles Innovation Fair and Summit in Washington D.C.

Open to the public, the Innovation Fair on Nov. 14 will feature MRC and other exhibitors dedicated to addressing the challenges facing our nation’s recycling system and protecting the environment. MRC recycles more than 1.5 million mattresses each year through its Bye Bye Mattress program in the states where mattress recycling laws have passed: California, Connecticut and Rhode Island. Each state’s program is funded by a recycling fee that is collected when a mattress or box spring is sold.

More than 80 percent of mattress components can be recycled by diverting valuable resources including foam, metal and wood from regional landfills. MRC supports this effort by investing in research to identify new end markets to increase recycling rates, improve the efficiency of used mattress collection and identify mattress dismantling and recycling best practices.

The Innovation Fair is hosted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in partnership with the Institute for Scrap Recycling Industries, Keep America Beautiful, the Recycling Partnership and the Solid Waste Association of North America. The free Innovation Fair is designed to connect investors with recycling innovators, helping to spur market development and adoption of new technologies to increase recycling rates as well as create new products comprised of post-recycled content. Learn more or register to attend here.

At the America Recycles Summit on Nov. 15, MRC will join other invited representatives to highlight the successes and accomplishments of the last year and discuss what further actions are needed to advance the recycling system in the U.S.

MRC is also a signatory of the America Recycles Pledge, joining more than 150 other non-profit organizations, Fortune 500 companies, municipalities, recyclers and others committed to an ongoing dialogue and efforts to improve America’s recycling system.

About the Mattress Recycling Council

The Mattress Recycling Council (MRC) is a non-profit organization dedicated to the development and implementation of statewide mattress recycling programs for states that have enacted laws. The organization provides valuable information and resources for industry professionals. As a result, every mattress contributes to a cleaner, more positive future.

Mattress Recycling Council Promotes New No-Cost Sustainability Certification Program to California Mattress Manufacturers

Sleep Products Sustainability Program (SP2) Offers Manufacturers Training and Tools to Reduce Waste, Cut Energy Consumption and Lower Spending

SACRAMENTO, CA – The Mattress Recycling Council (MRC) has launched the Sleep Products Sustainability Program (SP2), a new environmental certification and sustainability initiative for mattress manufacturers in the state of California. SP2 training and certification is offered at no cost to mattress manufacturers that want to improve operations at their manufacturing plants, distribution centers, warehouses and/or offices. 

“SP2 is designed to reduce waste and energy consumption in the manufacturing process while increasing operational efficiencies and generating cost savings,” says Ryan Trainer, president of the Mattress Recycling Council (MRC) and the International Sleep Products Association (ISPA). “Developed as part of the bedding industry’s commitment to environmental stewardship, this voluntary program supports ongoing sustainability efforts.” 

SP2 offers individual mattress manufacturers training to conduct an in-depth analysis to identify ways to reduce environmental impacts, establish best practices and set metrics to track progress by examining: 

  • The nature and designs of the products they manufacture
  • The raw materials they manage and consume in manufacturing and distributing those products
  • The energy, water and other resources needed in the manufacturing and distribution processes
  • Management and minimization of waste products generated at each stage in the manufacturing and distribution processes
  • How the products they manufacture today are managed at the end of their useful lives by recyclers

“This comprehensive approach will help participating manufacturers review, revise and improve their operations for better environmental performance,” says Justine Fallon, MRC’s director of operations. “The main goal is to help individual companies create voluntary proactive environmental management systems that can produce continual improvements over time.” 

Although initially available only to California mattress producers, MRC may expand the program to suppliers and retailers in that state and eventually to companies in other states that serve the California market, and perhaps elsewhere. Pleasant Mattress, based in Fresno, California, was the first manufacturer to undergo the training, and MRC expects two or three others to complete the training by the end of the year. 

“MRC encourages California mattress manufacturers to participate in this voluntary program to take advantage of the benefits it provides both to them and to the environment,” says Fallon. “Upon successful completion of the program, participants will earn an SP2 facility certification which they can promote to their customers, demonstrating their commitment to sustainability.” 

For additional information about the goals and benefits of SP2 and participation in this no-cost opportunity, California mattress manufacturers can visit www.MattressRecyclingCouncil.org/SP2 or contact Michael LaRussa, MRC program coordinator at 916-591-2540 or mlarussa@mattressrecyclingcouncil.org. 

About the Mattress Recycling Council 

The Mattress Recycling Council (MRC) is a non-profit organization dedicated to the development and implementation of statewide mattress recycling programs for states that have enacted laws. The organization provides valuable information and resources for industry professionals. As a result, every mattress contributes to a cleaner, more positive future.

Rhode Island Mattress Recycling Transportation

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS DUE 2/5/2019

The Mattress Recycling Council (MRC) is requesting proposals for transportation services in Rhode Island. This Request for Proposals (RFP) evaluates the costs and capabilities of transportation companies to help MRC comply with Rhode Island General Law 23-90, which requires mattress manufacturers to create a statewide recycling program for discarded mattresses. RFP submittals are due by February 7, 2019 . Two documents are attached:

1. RFP specification (pdf)
2. RFP forms 1-4 in Microsoft Word to simplify and standardize responses

Additional information can be found at MRC’s two web-sites; mattressrecyclingcouncil.org and ByeByeMattress.com. RFP questions must be submitted in writing to my attention by January 24, 2019.

Mattress Recycling Council Hires Program Coordinator

Justine Fallon(Alexandria, VA) — The Mattress Recycling Council (MRC) is pleased to announce that Justine Fallon has been hired as MRC’s Northeast Program Coordinator. In this capacity, Ms. Fallon will act a liaison between mattress collection sites, transporters and recyclers.
MRC is a non-profit organization created by the International Sleep Products Association to develop statewide recycling programs in the three states that passed mattress recycling laws in 2013 (Connecticut, Rhode Island and California). MRC’s objective is to facilitate mattress recycling in a consumer friendly, efficient and cost-effective manner.

“We are excited to welcome Justine to the MRC team,” said Ryan Trainer, president of both MRC and ISPA. “With years of experience in solid waste and recycling programs, local outreach, contracting and vendor communications, Justine’s skill set is just what we need to develop and launch the Connecticut mattress recycling program. Her expertise will help us establish robust and successful mattress recycling options for Connecticut residents.”

MRC filed its Connecticut plan with the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) on July 1, 2014, as required by law. Once approved by DEEP, the Connecticut program will be administered by MRC under DEEP’s oversight. The program will be funded by a visible point-of-purchase fee that retailers will collect from consumers. MRC has proposed a $9 recycling fee for each mattress and foundation unit sold in the state. The fee is subject to Connecticut sale tax. DEEP has 90 days to review MRC’s proposed plan and fee for compliance with state law.

For additional information about the Mattress Recycling Council, state implementation timelines and the latest legislative developments in mattress recycling, please visit us at: https://mattressrecyclingcouncil.org

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California State Assembly Approves SB 254 (Hancock/Correa) Which Would Create A Used Mattress Recycling Program

Sacramento, CA – On Wednesday, September 11, 2013, the California State Assembly voted to approve SB 254 authored by Senator Loni Hancock (D-Berkeley) and Senator Lou Correa (D-Santa Ana) by a 63-10 bipartisan vote.

SB 254 (Hancock/Correa) creates a used mattress recycling program that will have a dedicated funding mechanism, reduce the impact of illegally dumped mattresses, harness existing infrastructure for transporting used mattresses to recyclers, create jobs, and minimize costs to both government and consumers.

International Sleep Products Association President, Ryan Trainer commented, “We are very pleased the members of the California State Assembly recognize the merits of SB 254. All stakeholders collaborated to help refine this legislation into a used mattress recycling policy that will benefit consumers, retailers, manufacturers, and the environment.  This is an effective and efficient piece of legislation and ISPA is proud to be a part of the solution in dealing with recycling used mattresses.”

SB 254 enjoys a broad range of support from industry, retailers, cities and counties, local elected officials, and waste management organizations. Per the legislation, SB 254 creates a non-profit mattress recycling organization whose duty would be to plan, implement and administer a state system to collect discarded used mattresses, dismantle them and recycle their materials for use in new products. The program will be sustained by collecting a nominal fee at retail on the sale of new mattresses and box-springs.

Many of the SB 254 coalition members recently participated in a press conference to demonstrate their support to the legislation.  During the event, co-author of SB 254, Senator Lou Correa stated, “Californians buy about 4 million new mattresses and box springs each year, and discard roughly 2 million units.  Dealing with discarded mattresses is a big job for this state.  The goals set forth in SB 254 establish a sound foundation to move California forward in further preserving and protecting our communities from blight.”

SB 254 provides Californians with a comprehensive mattress recycling solution that is consumer-friendly, cost-effective and efficient. The program authorized by SB 254 is very similar to existing recycling systems in California and other states for other consumer products.

Shelly Sullivan representing Californians for Mattress Recycling stated, “Californians are committed to their recycling practices.  SB 254 (Hancock/Correa) simply puts a price on used mattresses akin to California’s bottle and can recycling program and gives Californians another avenue to broaden the scope of the state’s recycling portfolio.”

In the next few days SB 254 (Hancock/Correa) will move to the Senate Floor for a concurrence vote.

Californians for Mattress Recycling is an ad hoc group representing stakeholders united in their support for efficient and practical mattress recycling.  For more information contact Shelly Sullivan at (916) 858-8686 or go to:  http://www.ca4mattressrecycling.org

 

 

SB 254 Press Conference -- Mattress Recycling Done Right

Sacramento, CA (PRWEB) September 03, 2013

California State Senators Loni Hancock (SD-9, Berkeley); Lou Correa (SD-34, Santa Ana); Ryan Trainer, President, International Sleep Products Association; Mark Murray, Californians Against Waste and others will join Californians for Mattress Recycling in a press conference discussing the merits of SB 254.

SB 254 establishes a pubic policy program for the management of used mattresses that will create an economical and practical system for recycling used mattresses, reduce the impact of illegally dumped mattresses, harness existing infrastructure for transporting used mattresses to recyclers, and minimize costs to both government and consumers.

Press Conference will begin at 10:00 a.m., Wednesday, September 4, 2013.

State Capitol – West Steps
Visual – Used Mattresses on the Capitol West Steps

California State Senator Loni Hancock (SD-9, Berkeley
California State Senator Lou Correa (SD-34, Santa Ana)
Mr. Ryan Trainer, International Sleep Products Association
Mr. Mark Murray, Californians Against Waste
Ms. Shelly Sullivan, Californians for Mattress Recycling

Californians for Mattress Recycling is an ad hoc group representing stakeholders united in their support for efficient and practical mattress recycling.

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/9/prweb11086435.htm

Mattress manufacturers get out in front of proposed tax

AS REPORTED BY CAL WATCHDOG.COM:

August 11th, 2013
By Katy Grimes

Many still believe it’s a crime to remove the “Do Not Remove Under Penalty of Law” tag from a mattress. Chances are they would never illegally dump an old mattress either. But, in many areas of the state, illegally dumped mattresses are a problem — a big enough problem that the Legislature is now addressing it.

National Lampoon 'Crime' cover, Feb. 1972SB 254 by Sen. Loni Hancock, D-Berkeley, and Sen. Lou Correa, D-Santa Ana, would mandate mattress manufacturers to pay the entire cost of mattress recycling — a cost which would undoubtedly be tacked on to the price of a new mattress. It  has already been passed by the Senate and will be heard in the Assembly Natural Resources Committee on Monday.

The bill would require mattress manufacturers to organize, operate and pay for all mattress recycling in the state. “Illegally dumped mattresses are a terrible blight on our communities,” Hancock said in a press release.  “They not only deface a neighborhood but they can become a health hazard and a breeding ground for mold and pests. Cash-strapped cities are forced to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars collecting and disposing of abandoned mattresses.  That’s money that could be better spent on police and other vital services for the community.”

But it’s already illegal to dump a mattress, isn’t it? Yes it is.

Hancock says that doesn’t mean the problem of mattress dumping isn’t real. And while she acknowledges that mattress recycling is a very labor-intensive and cost-prohibitive business, she maintains SB 254 will alleviate that.

Why are manufacturers held responsible? This is California

So why is the illegal dumping of old mattresses the responsibility of manufacturers? Old abandoned cars are not the responsibility of General Motors. Abandoned homes are not the responsibility of the builder.

Adding another fee to consumers is rarely a good option. But faced with the Democratic supermajority in the Legislature, which almost always seeks to impose mandates, regulations and additional costs on private sector businesses, mattress manufacturers chose to get out in front of the problem rather than wait to be regulated without any input. SB 254 could be a win-win, without actually costing Californians much more at checkout.

In an interview in April with Christopher Hudgins, with the International Sleep Products Association, he said there are several issues with old mattresses, besides the unsightly abandoned mattress street litter in some areas of the state. Faced with Hancock’s bill and a potential mandate, his association worked up an alternative solution.

Many mattress manufacturers already recycle old mattresses — the materials are highly recyclable.  But it is expensive and labor-intensive, according to Hudgins. And some mattress manufacturers say they recycle the old mattresses, not by destroying them, but by selling them to a third party for refurbishment and eventual resale. The problem is, the old mattresses aren’t always refurbished properly prior to being sold again.

Mattress recycling could become much bigger business

There are currently eight locations which recycle mattresses in California. While the current process to dismantle and turn used mattresses into raw materials for reuse is arduous, this is the reason a fee is needed to offset these costs.

However, supporters of SB 254 believe as the recycling law is implemented, and the financial incentive is created, more recycling centers will open. Some will become more automated than others, supporters claim this will create jobs, while removing the burden of having used mattresses in our landfills, and diminishing the illegal dumping of used mattresses.

I asked Shelly Sullivan, the spokeswoman for Californians for Mattress Recycling, what this program will cost the state. Sullivan said the newly created organization would reimburse the state for appropriate oversight costs.

As for a mechanism to measure accountability, Sullivan said, “The organization’s activities will be transparent and open to public input, and subject to annual performance and financial audits that would be published on its website.”

What criteria will be used to measure the success of the program? “The state’s oversight authority would confirm whether the organization has met its statutory obligations,” Sullivan explained.

Mattress recycling organization would be non-profit

If enacted, SB 254 would create a non-profit mattress recycling organization made up of retailers and manufacturers whose duty would be to plan, implement, and administer a state system to collect discarded used mattresses, dismantle them and recycle their materials for use in new products.

According to the bill analysis, “This bill establishes the Used Mattress Recovery and Recycling Act (Act), which requires mattress manufacturers and retailers to develop a mattress stewardships program to increase the recovery and recycling of used mattresses to reduce illegal dumping.”

SB 254 would require mattress manufacturers to submit a recovery and recycling plan to CalRecycle by April 1, 2015. Consistent with existing state policy, the plans would have a goal of recycling at least 75 percent of used mattresses in California by Jan. 1, 2020.

– See more at: http://calwatchdog.com/2013/08/11/mattress-manufacturers-get-out-in-front-of-proposed-tax/#sthash.SAkmz94d.dpuf

 

CALIFORNIA USED MATTRESS RECYCLING LEGISLATION APPROVED BY CALIFORNIA STATE SENATE SB

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE May 30, 2013

CALIFORNIA USED MATTRESS RECYCLING LEGISLATION
APPROVED BY CALIFORNIA STATE SENATE SB 254
254 (Hancock/Correa) Now Moves to the Assembly 

(Sacramento, CA) — On Wednesday, May 29, 2013, California’s State Senate approved SB 254 (Hancock/Correa) by a 32-5 bipartisan vote.

SB 254 creates a used mattress recycling program that will reduce the impact of illegally dumped mattresses, harness existing infrastructure for transporting used mattresses to recyclers, create jobs, and minimize costs to both government and consumers.

International Sleep Products Association President, Ryan Trainer commented, “We are very pleased the California State Senate recognizes that SB 254 will improve used mattress recycling in the state in a practical and efficient manner. Since its inception, all stakeholders have been diligently working to craft sound used mattress recycling policy that will benefit consumers, retailers, manufacturers, and the environment. I want to thank the bill’s authors, Senators Loni Hancock and Lou Correa, for their leadership on this issue.”

The legislation provides Californians with a comprehensive mattress recycling solution that is consumer-friendly, cost-effective and efficient. The program authorized by SB 254 is very similar to existing recycling systems in California and other states for other consumer products.

SB 254 enjoys a broad range of support from industry, retailers, cities and counties, local elected officials, and waste management organizations. It creates a non-profit mattress recycling organization that will plan, implement and administer a state system to collect discarded used mattresses, dismantle them and recycle their materials for use in new products. The program will be funded by a nominal fee collected at retail on the sale of new mattresses and box-springs.

Shelly Sullivan representing Californians for Mattress Recycling stated, “SB 254 (Hancock/Correa) simply puts a nominal fee on used mattresses akin to California’s paint recycling program. It’s good common sense legislation that helps Californians improve their recycling performance.”

SB 254 (Hancock-Correa) now moves to the Assembly for Committee hearings and a floor vote.

Californians for Mattress Recycling is an ad hoc group representing stakeholders united in their support for efficient and practical mattress recycling.  For more information contact Shelly Sullivan at (916) 858-8686 or go to:  http://www.ca4mattressrecycling.org

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SB 254 - where are you today?

On April 29, 2013 our legislation, SB 254 (Hancock-Correa) was heard in the Senate Appropriations Committee.  Senate Appropriations is where any legislation with a fiscal impact to the state must be heard.  The Appropriations Chairman, Senator Kevin de Leon ordered the bill to the ‘suspense file.’  All ‘suspense file’ bills will be heard toward the end of May.  We expect SB 254 to come off the ‘suspense file’ and move to the Senate Floor for a vote before May 31st, which is the deadline for all bills to be passed out of the house of origin (in this case the Senate).

California is not alone in its "Recycling Sate of Mind"

Prior to adjourning on March 14, the Utah Legislature passed a resolution announcing its intent to study “the creation and implementation of a program to recycle mattresses.” 
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